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Torgeir

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what would you feel was better at doing sound quality than pure bass?

im thinking abaout doing a pure polk db sound system setup that an local store is selling..

the car is an 09 golf stv

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It is so dependent on the install. You could have top shelf Zapco across the board, but if the install was not good, I could easily assemble a budget system for 1/10th the price from parts-express.com and sound better to the ear.

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ouch that hurt : )

yeah i see what you mean.. but

it dont kinda ansver my question..

so what kinda equipment is better at produsing sound quality rather then just loud sound if annyone can see/understand what i mean???

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I was not trying to be mean, I am just trying to explain to not focus on a singular brand just based on a reputation of perceived sound quality. You could easily run Polk on everything, personally since they sold, I feel their quality has dropped, so if wanting to go Polk, look for their older models.

In focusing on the equipment, you need to figure out all the parameters of the equipment and appropriately mate them with other equipment that goes together well. In other words, pay more attention to the front stage, head unit settings, amplifier cross over points, amplifier gains, driver positioning, sound deadening, etc. etc.

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no meaness found... : )

ok.. well.. could you do me an favor an describe what you mean by frontstage?

im gona get help with the xover and all that and driver position is kinda hard to do somthing to do abaout, im working on sound deadening the car.

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annyone else have anny thoughts on producers?

some people like buying it from a dealer who tell you what to do which is the wrong way to do it . i could sell you cheap polk coaxials for the back seat when a real audiofile/ sq quy knows the tweet will be distracting it will distract you from your front stage. see the front stage is like a stage infront of you were the music is comeing from. when you start putting any thing above 100 hz behind you it becomes distracting you will want to look back in to the back seat. the sub in the truck is below a 100 hz and you can not tell driection the bass is coming from all it is is reinforement to the front stage a little pep. car sq is different then home theater but simular cause of envirement ware it is at.

all you need is to go buy is the keep it simple method for the source unit / cd player the more fuction you got the easier it is to screw up. a 3 band parametric eq with some x over and a seprate bass level and x over sould work for you. run the componet off the source unit speaker wires and sub amp from the source units rca's for the cheap keep it simple method. that's what i suggest what i do not suggest is 512 band eq's any thing that complicarte set up more then needed. you lose power you got to reset the hu same with the 512 band eq which is a problem cause you will need a real time analizer or rta for short.any ways the system is designed for enjoyment not spl level when done right if it to fatigueing you went to big/ pain full on the ears in other words.any ways hope this help ya out.

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if looking for brands try focal, morel,brax, audison, for high end low end try cadence ,phenoix gold rsd , polk , diamond audio for high and low end, i am running a cadance z kit right now with a silk tweet i only paid 60 for i think they work great. mainly any thing with silk works great it mellower not as harsh as mylar or metals. try e-bay for those brands even ssaudio.com carries some great brand like brovox and incriminator audio which have silk tweets. may want to stay away from any thing over 100 on your first set up for speakers/subs cause you may blow from abuse miss-use. just my thought on it. ssa has some of the finest gear out there best price for the money on amps and subs etc... best i have heard yet .

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Here is some reading material for you sir ...

Terms to Know about Car Audio: Aspects of Sound Quality

By Doug Newcomb

Listening to audiophiles go on about the sound quality of their audio systems — from their woofers to their tweeters — can sound a lot like oenophiles going on and on about the qualities of wine. To understand such talk, start by understanding the four basics of sound quality:

  • Clarity

  • Dynamic range

  • Frequency response

  • Tonal balance

Clarity

Clarity is the ability of a system to produce the original signal as intended, without distortion. Distortion can be caused by numerous things — from a head unit that's not level-matched with an amplifier to an amplifier that's clipping, or being overdriven and sending a distorted signal to the speakers. And distortion can come from any component in a system.

A good test is to listen to cymbals, which can have a brassy and off-putting sound when distorted. High-pitched female vocals are also difficult to reproduce and can reveal distortion rather easily.

Achieving clarity and therefore avoiding distortion is all about proper system design and tuning. It's making sure components are of sufficient quality and compatible with one another and that signal levels are well matched between electronics. It also involves using a component as it was intended and not pushing it past its design limits.

Dynamic range

Dynamic range refers to the ability of a system to reproduce loud and soft passages in music with the same level of detail. When you're at a live concert, a singer may wail and then whisper or a drummer may hit a drum head with brute force and then back off a bit. Each extreme is an important part of the performance.

If the performance is recorded and reproduced by an audio system, the loud and soft parts should be delivered with the same detail and accuracy. But often a system tends to suppress soft parts and emphasize loud ones, meaning you lose the subtleties of the performance.

A related concept is linearity, which refers to a system's tendency to lose detail when the volume is turned down. A system has great linearity if it can retain the same detail at a low volume that it does when it's cranked up.

Frequency response

Every sound you hear, from the low rumble of thunder to the high-pitch wail of a siren, is caused by vibrations in the air that occur at certain frequencies. These vibrations are measured in hertz (Hz), which refers to the number of times per second these vibrations occur.

Humans can hear frequencies roughly from 20 to 20,000 Hz. A car audio system's frequency response represents how much of the audible frequency spectrum it can reproduce. The frequency response of a car audio system can be measured by an instrument known as a real-time analyzer (RTA), which consists of a microphone attached to a processor with a display that has a graph that shows a system's response.

Tonal balance

An ideal car audio system uniformly reproduces the entire audible frequency spectrum from 20 to 20,000 Hz. But no system — at least while playing music — is perfect. Music is dynamic; some parts are loud and some are soft, so a system will naturally have dips and peaks in its frequency response.

Although a system can have these peaks and dips in frequency response, it needs to have good tonal balance — a relatively equal amount of sonic energy across the frequency range — to sound good. Subsequently, system designers and tuners often measure frequency response to gauge which frequencies may need to be boosted or cut as opposed to trying to achieve a flat frequency response. This can be done with an equalizer, although it's best that the system is designed in such a way that it has good tonal balance to begin with.

Read more: http://www.dummies.c...l#ixzz1IGxrzAQ8

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Here is some more ...

Advanced Car Audio Sound Quality Concepts

By Doug Newcomb

Although the four basic sound quality concepts (clarity, dynamic range, frequency response, and tonal balance) are the most fundamental to understand before purchasing a new car audio system, there are a few other sound quality attributes that are also important.

Timbre

Timbre (pronounced "TAM-bir") refers to a system's ability to recreate the sound of an instrument as it was originally intended to be heard. An acoustic guitar is usually a good test for this because most people have heard one. Does the sound have that warm, slightly resonant quality that the instrument is known for, or does it merely sound like a low-resolution reproduction of that signature sound?

Tonal accuracy

Tonal accuracy describes how faithful a system is in general to the original recording. It can apply to instruments as well as vocals. The more accurate the system is while playing a good recording, the more you feel as if you are there, listening to a live performance as opposed to a recording.

Tonal accuracy can also apply to the ambiance in a recording, which refers to the space in which a recording is made. Most modern recordings are made in a sort of vacuum, with individual instruments recorded separately or, in the case of some rap music, the individual parts are sampled from other recordings. But many older recordings, some modern ones, and almost all live albums capture the environment in which the performance was recorded. In fact, certain recording studios and performance spaces are known and revered for their sound, which give a recording or performance a specific ambiance.

Think of timbre and tonal accuracy as the reproduction of how close you get to the actual performance or how the producer intended for it to sound. Whether it's the sound of Miles Davis's trumpet, Jimmy Page's guitar, a Dr. Dre beat, or the ambiance of Carnegie Hall, how well a system can reproduce it the way it went down in a studio or concert hall determines the difference between a good system and a great one.

Staging and imaging

Staging and imaging are related concepts that go back to the heyday of stereo, and therefore don't always apply to modern music. The basic idea is that when you're listening to a stereo recording, the system should recreate the illusion of the stage on which the performance occurred, and you should be able to pinpoint the sonic image of the individual performers and instruments within the stage.

Think about the example of a basic rock band that includes a singer, guitarist, bass player, and drummer. You should be able to close your eyes and picture the singer at the center of the stage, the guitarist to the right, the bass player on the left, and the drummer center and behind the singer. Keep in mind that this is an ideal that sound quality systems should approach if not achieve. With rap and many pop-music recordings, the vocalist will be centered, but the concept of a band playing on a stage doesn't exactly apply.

Speaker placement has a dramatic effect on staging and imaging, and hardcore enthusiasts often go to great lengths to position their speakers for the best possible results. This includes rebuilding door panels to better position speakers. Some have even built elaborate mechanisms to mount speakers in or raise them above the dash in order to achieve better staging and imaging.

Finally, no discussion of sound quality would be complete without mentioning interior acoustics. A car's interior, its reflective surfaces (such as glass), and its absorptive materials (upholstery) play a dramatic role in a system's response. And every car interior is different; if you install the exact same components in your Toyota Camry that your friend has in his Chrysler 300C, the systems will sound very different.

Read more: http://www.dummies.c...l#ixzz1IGyu3hCJ

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How bout one more ...

Steps to Great Car Audio Sound

By Doug Newcomb

It takes a lot to create a good car audio system. Here are six basic steps every car audio enthusiast should take on the path to great sound.

Making up your mind

One of the first things you need to do is decide what type of system you want. Do you want one that can reproduce your music so that it sounds like you're at a live concert? Or do you want a system that can simply blast out a bunch of bass? Maybe you want a system that can do both. By starting with a goal in mind, you can save yourself from potentially wasting money on components or wasting time on designs and installations that don't fit your overall objectives.

Doing your homework

Do your homework by researching which components fit your car (the size of the speaker and the factory-radio openings) and best accomplish what you want your system to do, what they cost, and where they're available.

Information is power, and the more information you have, the more you'll be empowered to make the best decisions on equipment and system design.

Using your ears

A car audio system is a very personal thing — for your ears only. Although you may get advice from others on which components to buy, how they should be installed, and how the system should be tuned, you should be the ultimate authority on the subject. After all, you're the one spending the money on a car audio system. It's your car and they are your ears: They'll tell you what kind of sound is best.

Using your head

Are you sure you want to install a system that costs twice as much as your car? Do you really want to rip out the back seat to install subwoofers? Is it wise to fill up the trunk of the car with amplifiers so that you can't even carry a bag of groceries?

It's easy to get carried away when planning, shopping for, and installing a car audio system. Try to keep a level head when putting together your system, taking into account how you use your car, how long you plan to keep it, how much you've budgeted, and other such considerations. Too many people make poor choices and regret it afterward.

Cranking it up

When shopping for car audio equipment, don't be afraid to play music at loud volumes to get a sense of how a speaker or subwoofer performs. Most components are made to play music at loud volume and perform their best when cranked up. Same thing goes for after you get the stuff installed in your car. Don't hesitate to crank it up from time to time.

Turning it down

Of course, there's a limit to how much you want to crank it up. A little distortion is inevitable, but a lot can damage components, particularly speakers. When you hear distortion or a problem with a component, turn it down.

And when you're driving through a quiet neighborhood, turn it down. You also want to be careful not to crank it so loud that you don't hear sirens from emergency vehicles. And you don't want to play your system so loud that it damages your ears — otherwise you won't be enjoying music for years to come.

Read more: http://www.dummies.c...l#ixzz1Mmp2uVMn

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What the heck ... Here's one more ...

How to Measure Sound Quality

There are many ways to measure sound quality. Many measurements have been created to specifically measure and rate the quality of sound. Here are a few of the most common types of measurements used for sound quality.

THD

THD stands for Total Harmonic Distortion. It is a measurement taken to view the total amount of distortion from the original audio signal at playback. Most quality components have less than 1% distortion rate, loudspeakers can have 1 to 5% distortion rate and bass subwoofers can produce the most distortion sometimes approaching 10%. However, human ears can't differentiate distortion at very low bass levels.

Output Power

Output power is the maximum energy per channel, usually shown as Watts. Most speakers or receivers show the amount of watts that they have. There are two measurements peak and RMS. Peak watts is usually what is shown on advertisements, it is usually the maximum amount of energy that a speaker or receiver can give off for a very short period of time. RMS stands for Root Means Square and is a more appropriate way to determine power over a longer period of time.

Frequency Response

Frequency Response is an important way to determine the quality of sound. Most human ears can hear frequency (sound) that is from about 20 HZ to about 20K HZ. Bass forms the lower parts of the Frequency response spectrum. Most people consider bass frequencies, those frequencies below 310 HZ. Bass frequencies include percussion and explosions from movie DVD's. Midrange frequencies are those frequencies that range from about 310 HZ to about 12K HZ. These frequencies include dialogue and most of the human voice, piano, guitar and other instruments. High frequencies are at the top of the frequency response spectrum. They are usually from 12K to about 20K or higher. They include cymbals, high notes from the human voice, and some string instruments.

Signal to Noise Ratio

Signal to noise ratio is the ratio of quality sound to noise. This measurement is used to measure many devices including receivers, CD players, DVD players, etc. Usually the higher the decibel (Db), he better the quality of sound. For instance, a signal to noise ratio of 90 or 100 decibels is considered high fidelity. Most electronics are usually 80 decibels or over which is great for many discerning human ears.

It is important to note that the above terms are not the only way to measure sound. There are various ways to measure sound, components and media which are either digital or analog. However, knowing about the above terms does give you some insight into the process of measuring sound quality

enjoy ...

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cablguy184 thankies.. got to reread that later when im more well and awake heh..

it seems i need to do some more researsh and got to see if im gona save up some more.

btw in that golf of mine there is 8 speakers.. .

Edited by Noobdelux

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cablguy184 thankies.. got to reread that later when im more well and awake heh..

it seems i need to do some more researsh and got to see if im gona save up some more.

btw in that golf of mine there is 8 speakers.. .

there maybe 8 holes but you will not use them all does it have 4 in front like a tweet and woofer combo for the driver and passanger?if so for sq those are the only ones you will use unless your use a rear audio fill which complictes stuff they have to peak out about 100 hertz and not have a tweet this is about the same as a stock set upbut adds mid bass. you may have speakers in the rear door hatch back ,c/d etc pilar and in the rear doors deside the front stage all you realy need is the front stage . then all you need is either a 3 way set or a 2 way set for the front componets a source unit along with sub amp and sub what i suggest is some thing like a 12 sub in a sealed or ported box for more bass.then all it is is tuning it in your front stage depending on the setting play the widest spectrum of music from low 80 hertz all the way to about 30,000hertz.the sub playsaround 80 and less depending on the settings realy do not even need the sub it adds impact to the music during a peak point. but don't need it but it helps those. cars you hear cruseing around town with loud music are toatal dumb asses. they don't need to listen to it that loud but do see my point there just trying to drawl attenion to them selfs. and get their shit ripped lol'z and wreck it for the deadicated people to spl and realy loud sound quality who behave them selfs

and boom correctly. in other words don't be that guy lol's. if you need help on any thing there is always a ton of smart people here willing to help ya out just let us know.

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You know we could help you out alot better and leave out the guess work if you could take and post pictures of the dash, a-pillars, kick pannels, doors, and anything else you might want to work on or ask for help with ...

Most people start a build log ...

just my suggestion here ...

Randal ...

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You know we could help you out alot better and leave out the guess work if you could take and post pictures of the dash, a-pillars, kick pannels, doors, and anything else you might want to work on or ask for help with ...

Most people start a build log ...

just my suggestion here ...

Randal ...

great point!

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what would you feel was better at doing sound quality than pure bass?

im thinking abaout doing a pure polk db sound system setup that an local store is selling..

the car is an 09 golf stv

hay man do you live in europe i am haveing a hard time finding a 09 golf station wagen. i am not saying you don't own it just saying can't find it or maybe you got the wrong year lol'z who knows

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