Jump to content
Taylor Lewin

New Amps 2 Ohm In The 4 Ohm Taps

Recommended Posts

I found a DIYMA thread where Ray was mentioning that the 2250 could run this way an they were making insane power. However this was before production models where ready. Can this be done with adequate cooling?

  • Upvote 3
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im not best to answer this but i believe the amp has a 2ohm 4ohm bridge switch you can change in the amplifier but will not change the power output tho. on these amps i would not want to run 2ohm in 4ohm mode due to loss in efficiency. plus i think it will void warranty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have any real intention of doing this. I was just curious because I heard that the prototypes where making over 1000 watts at 12volts in this configuration and where stable doing this with a cooling fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i gotcha... i also after thinking more think you can run them at 2ohms in the 4ohm taps but the protection circuit will kick in when it sees to much current draw so you probably wont see a HUGE increase before the amp goes protect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

** 2-ohm power rating is tested with the power supply taps in the 2-ohm setting, leaving the taps in the 4 ohm setting will generate considerable additional power however it is not suggested or recommended.

So if I wanted to get the most power out of my modded 2202IQ and I run a 2ohm load in the 4ohm mode it will void warrantee and/or damage the amp?

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. It's even more risky doing it to a modded amp. It isn't recommended at all.

LP amps are unique. They are not built to double their power at a 2 ohm load as almost all other amps are. They are built for sound quality with the greatest intention of having users run the amps at 4 ohm for the utmost sound quality. The 2 ohm taps are really only there to accomodate people who already have drivers that present a 2 ohm load. This was done as a convenience.

Edited by smoothfidelity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone please tell me why they are giving Kingstroker a (-1) for the first post n this tread ?? Nothing wrong with asking a serious question about these amps ...

Whoever is doing this please stop or give me a reason why ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ray told me the amps would run fine until the protection circuit ruins the fun so there is no point in trying with the new amps. All I was looking for was an actual answer. I understand what the taps do and how they do it and why they do it. I was only curious because of the exremely overbuilt nature of the amps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just gave him a +1, so he is ahead of the game now.

not anymore, stupid me not knowing what it was all about clicked on the down arrow and now I'm zero, and so ashamed :noob:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have never recommended loads lower than we specified for any model amp. The purpose of any mod we have ever done has nothing to do with running lower impedance loads.

The protection circuit in the new amps will not allow it to run those improper loads at any major power level. We have the output stage and the power supply protected from over current conditions by two separate circuits that work independantly of each other. Once the amp has reach our predetermined current limits it will shut down.

We did not build these amps with the current capability and high power output they have, in order for someone to run a lower impedance load, we did it to make them as dead solid on power output as we could at the recommended impedance loads and to have extreme reserve for the best dynamics and headroom possible, as well as, more reliability and longevity than anything we have ever made before.

High voltage amps make as much or more power than high current design and do so more efficiently, with higher sound quality and reliability.

Every time the impedance load is cut in half damping factor and headroom is also halved, current draw and distortion is doubled, transistor life is reduced and efficiency is lost and more power is lost as heat. Any electronic or electrical engineer outside car audio will tell you designing for high voltage in ANY electrical circuit is better than a high current situation. We are the only electrical industry that pushes high current design and the reason for it was to cheat in the stereo contests starting in the mid 1980's. there is no electrical advantage.

High voltage is used for high power applications all over other electrical industries, it produces high power with smaller cabling, and greater efficiency. This is why your large appliances in your home run on 220 volts instead of 110. This is why car manufacturers have discussed in recent years going to 24 or 48 volt electrical systems in cars. They can decrease cable size saving money on copper wire, reduce weight, improve system efficiency and produce equal or more power than a 12 volt systems can. A 48 volt system can use a cable roughly 1/4 the gauge as 12 volt and make the same power. This idea was used in the 1950's when manufacturers changed from 6 volt to 12 volt electrical systems in automobiles. This same principle works with the internal voltage in a car amplifier.

Ohms law states that current multipled by voltage equals power. You can raise current to increase power or raise voltage to do the same. You cannot raise both at high levels due to the limitations of the specs of the transistor. As an engineer you have to choose which path you want to take on the amplifier'sdesign and follow that design. Once you have mixed voltage and current to levels past the SOA (safe operating area) of the device or devices you have now made a time bomb. In a transistor,voltage and current are inversely proportionate, as voltage goes up current must come down to keep the transistor within its SOA and vise versa if current goes up.

So what reason is there to increase current by running a lower impedance load to make power and add so many negative effects by doing it; when you can raise voltage and have the same power increases while retaining better sonic capability, efficiency and reliability. The principle of high voltage design is what has made all of our amps last so long and still be in high demand and still bringing premium prices all these many years later.

The limits to either design is either you can go no lower in impedance to keep gaining power and your losses keep multiplying with high current, or the limit to high voltage design is the voltage limits of a device.

You can make an amp make all the power you want into 4, 8 or even 16 ohms. You just have to build the amp to provide the voltage needed to make the mathematics work.

Edited by Linear Power
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole purpose for the two sets of power supply taps in the amps were to raise voltage for high impedance loads or lower voltage for lower impedance loads to allow for the higher current draw. The taps were added for versatility and convenience for the customer that had a previous speaker system that he does not want to replace with new speakers to get the best impedance load. Even though our amps will run 2 ohm stereo or 4 ohm bridged, it is still more advantageous to use a 4 ohm stereo or 8 ohm bridged load due to the higher efficiency of the high voltage taps and the better SQ specs of a higher impedance load.

The mathematics basically equal the same power since if voltage is raised and current is reduced by running a higher impedance load in the higher voltage transformer windings, or voltage is reduced and current increased across a lower impedance load in the lower voltage taps.

Running a lower impedance load in the high voltage taps can damage the amp or throw it into protection or both on any of our old amps. On the new amps they will reach their preset current limits we have programmed and then shut off. The amp doesn't really care what the impedance load is, it looks at the current asked from it and will not allow it to exceed that level.

Edited by Linear Power
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×