linearpower

The NEW Linear Power amps

116 posts in this topic

I bet it does, I got a quick look at the guts of the new amps and notice how it didn't have a million components like others.

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A few specs and features of the new amps are:

Smaller foot print than previous Linear Power amps of the same power rating. Higher efficiency power supply and output stages reduce heat dissapation and lower heat sink temperatures. ALL CLASS A/B operation, no Class D amplification, these are EXTREME SQ amplifiers.

Traditional style heatsinks still maintain the Linear Power look.

7 protection circuits make killing this amp a very hard job, reliability should be even higher than the old standards set by Linear Power for longivity.

Over voltage, Under voltage protection, Reverse polarity protection, Over current protection from low impedance loads, Short circuit protection from shorted wiring, Thermal protection, DC Offset protection.

Output and power supply stages are working at a fraction of their rated capabilities. (35 percent or less of capability at rated power)

Fan circuit with optional fan shroud for the LP2075 and LP2150, stock on the LP2250 and 5.1 Surround and 6 channel amps. Fan circuit activates low noise (34 dB noise floor) fan kit at 60 degrees C, thermal shut down of amp at 80 degrees C.

Only 33 amps of current draw at full power on the LP2150 (150 x 2 RMS @ 12 volts)

Idle current less than .9 amps

Operating voltage range 10.5 volts-15 volts DC

Turn on Audio delay 3 seconds, instant audio mute at turn off

Heavy 3 ounce copper traces reduce board losses and increase efficiency.

Independant grounding for each pre-amp channel, audio driver stage and output section maintaining the highest channel separation possible with the lowest noise floor and minimal channel cross talk.

Heavy board grounding in the audio stages to reduce radiated and induced noises, keeping the noise floor and distortion figures as low as possible.

Rail voltage filtering and storage caps directly at each half of each channel instead of relying on central storage and filtering caps. This reduces chances of noise entering the voltage paths after filtering at the power supply only and improves storage effectiveness by having storage directly at the output transistors.

Frequency bandwidth 6 Hz to 220kHz.

Damping factor rated at greater than 375 at lowest point in the circuit (speaker terminals) and at any frequency

"Floating" ground pre-amp and output stage (no connection to power supply ground, to reduce noise)

High quality SQ rated ON Semiconductor rated large cased (TO-3P) output devices

Independant op amps for each channel, for greater channel separation, no sharing of signals between devices.

Ultra quiet and high speed high frequency audio op amps in pre-amp.

Minimal electrolytic caps in audio chain.

By-pass caps on all audio electrolytics that are used in the audio chain.

High temp, low leakage low ESR caps used through out amp. (105 C)

1 percent mil spec metal film resistors used in all vital areas.

We will have more specs in the near future, these 5 prototypes were finished at midnight Monday Jan 3, bias was set and the amps boxed and shipped out for CES in Las Vegas Tuesday morning. They have not been tweaked out or fully tested yet.

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What kind of MSRP are we looking at on the new LP amplifiers?

We are in the very initial stages of pricing the amp. We have the working prototypes that we can start figuring cost and prices from. But a ball park price on the

LP2150 will be around 750-850.00 give or take some. Considering the 3002 (150 x 2) was last produced over 20 years ago and it sold for 699.00 this is not much of a price jump, especially for the amount of quality put into it.

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Wow that is a great price range considering the made in USA hand built quality.

:rockwoot:

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Completely out of my price range for the next several years. However, I am seriously in love with the features list you just provided us with. I can't wait until I get to hear these one day, much less own one. I've not heard of a single Linear owner here in GA.

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The amps look pricey but considering the level of quality, the sound and the performance not to mention the longivity they are quite a value. There are Linear Power amps, as many here already know, that are still working after 25 or 30 years, and still bring premium prices on the internet.

If you pay 300 for an Asian product and get two years use out of it, the cost is around 150 dollars a year. Now buy ours that is designed for 20 plus years of service for say 800, the yearly cost is like 40 dollars or less for the amp or around $3.25 or less a month. Then think of how many cheap amps you may have to repair or buy in the same 20 year period to replace each one that burns up and figure the total cost. Not forgetting the Asian amps do not approach the level of sound quality these amps have and that our amps are rated at RMS power at very low distortions(hundredths of one percent or less,0.0--%) at 12 volts, not MAX power at 1.0%+ distortion and 14.4 volts to stretch the power figure as BIG as it can get to give you an over inflated figure that would be mostly, if not totally, impossible to ever get in normal user conditions. If we rated our amps like the Asians and other US amplifiers they would have much larger power ratings than we state. So all in all they are a great value, and we can proudly say we are TRUELY designed and built in the USA!

Edited by Linear Power
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The amps look pricey but considering the level of quality, the sound and the performance not to mention the longivity they are quite a value. There are Linear Power amps, as many here already know, that are still working after 25 or 30 years, and still bring premium prices on the internet.

If you pay 300 for an Asian product and get two years use out of it, the cost is around 150 dollars a year. Now buy ours that is designed for 20 plus years of service for say 800, the yearly cost is like 40 dollars or less for the amp or around $3.25 or less a month. Then think of how many cheap amps you may have to repair or buy in the same 20 year period to replace each one that burns up and figure the total cost. Not forgetting the Asian amps do not approach the level of sound quality these amps have and that our amps are rated at RMS power at very low distortions(hundredths of one percent or less,0.0--%) at 12 volts, not MAX power at 1.0%+ distortion and 14.4 volts to stretch the power figure as BIG as it can get to give you an over inflated figure that would be mostly, if not totally, impossible to ever get in normal user conditions. If we rated our amps like the Asians and other US amplifiers they would have much larger power ratings than we state. So all in all they are a great value, and we can proudly say we are TRUELY designed and built in the USA!

thats what its all about right there. you get what you pay for.

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I know it's been covered already but how's the efficiency for this new amp?

Most A/B class today do 65% @ 4 ohm.

What about LP? @ 8 ohm? @ 4 ohm?

Thanks,

Kelvin

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Ray can give the exact number, but from what I remember when they were being developed, they were somewhere around 70% efficient @ 4ohm, not sure @ 8ohm.

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Ray can give the exact number, but from what I remember when they were being developed, they were somewhere around 70% efficient @ 4ohm, not sure @ 8ohm.

The amps are in the 71-73 percent efficiency range at 4 ohms, we have not measured it into 8 ohms but 8 ohms would be even higher due to the mathmatics and physics of the matter.

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The amps are in the 71-73 percent efficiency range at 4 ohms, we have not measured it into 8 ohms but 8 ohms would be even higher due to the mathmatics and physics of the matter.

Interesting, I seem to remember that the old LP amps needed high voltage and enough current to make rated power ; power hungry if I may call it. My friend has 1 2.2HV and 1 3.2HV - he told me that he needed a second battery in the back due to their "inneficiency" (sorry for the term).

Having a 70%+ efficient amp would mean that a normal charging system can power those amps without worrying about draining the main battery? Driving of course, not parking lot demonstration.

Kelvin

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The old Linear Power amps were always some of the more efficient class A/B amps with efficiencies in the lower 60 percent range. Considering basic class A/B design has a basis of around or a little over 50 percent.

What people did not realize is the difference between regulated and non- regulated power supply design. Which I will explain in my next post. I am not getting into that trying to type that from my phone.

Edited by Linear Power
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They are an unregulated power supply so they make more power with more voltage. They don't "require higher voltages". Since we are talking about an automotive environment then you expect 12-14.7v as your range of input. They higher the better (within reason).

When people talk about "high voltage amps" it tends to mean they make power at higher impedance loads instead of low loads. You can make any amount of power at any load. You just have to design the power supply to handle that load. LP amps have never been 1/2 ohm wonders. They are intended to make their power at 4 or 8 ohms typically. Using lower load numbers is just a marketing ploy. You can make 2908357239428-304pink239487234 watts into 128 ohms if you want.

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I will go into regulated and unregulated power supply design when I have a quiet time on my computer, it will help you understand what we do and why we do it. Steve has a very good start with it but it is far from the full story and what makes high voltage unregulated power supplies better.

One area of confusion is saying an amp is high voltage design means the internal voltage created in the step up transformer NOT high battery voltage.

Again, when I write the next post it will be self explanatory

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We have gone over high voltage and high current designs, and now I will speak about regulated and non-regulated power supply design.

In a regulated amplifier the power supply is controlled or regulated to work with in a voltage or power window and produce a given amount of power in a very small range. This reduces the peak current draw and averages it into a more continous current draw. The so called marketing advantage to this system is a product that looks more efficient and that will make the virtual same power from say 10 volts to 16 volts. The actual BAD things of this design is that first, if voltage drops, the amplifier has to make up for this voltage loss across the circuit by supplying more current which at very low voltages and over a sustained period of time drives a heavy load on the power supply and the power supply fets which in turn often fail. Secondly, there is no advantage for keeping voltage up and consistant (other than to keep your power supply alive), there basically is no power increase, other than a very small one. Thirdly, a regulated power supply has set a power ceiling as such on the capabilities of the power supply, this reduces overall dynamics and headroom of the amplifier, because there is no extra power to draw from. This is why most amps on the market have 1 dB or less of headroom or reserve power and very little dynamics. They fall on their face when a peak musical note comes along in the music and the amp is already being stressed to produce nearly full power for the normal listening level. They maybe able to respond with a little extra power but no where near the burst power to make a musical peak be reproduced properly.

A NON-regulated, or unregulated power supply design on the other hand has several advantages. One is that if battery power is held to a normally high level the amplifier can give you more power than it is rated for, if it was rated correctly to begin with. Secondly, if battery power drops the amp will not respond by driving itself with extraordinarily too much current and kill itself, the power just drops back. This gives the amplifier a secondary type of protection from low voltage, it just drops the power back with the drop in battery voltage and does not over current itself.

It should be your responsibility whether you have a regulated or unregulated power supply designed amplifier to have an adequate electrical system to support the amplifier. In 22 years of repairing all brands of amplifiers (90 pecent being regulated design) this is the second most common failure in amps (over driving or over curent of the power supply), this is only second, next to "too low of speaker impedance", which destroys the outputs then over drives the power supply, since most of these amps are high curent design and cannot utilize over current protection well enough (if at all) to protect the power supply. This is because the over-current protection to protect the power supply from too low of loads, bad speakers, or shorted wiring cannot discriminate closely enough between a short and the "normally" low load of the speaker. Either it is set to protect and falsely trip all the time (custmers bitch), or set not to false and provide inadequate or no protection and the amp fails(customers bitch). This is another good reason to drive higher impedance loads with high voltage amps, they can have protection that works, and that is not confused by a normal low impedance load or a NON normal bad low impedance load.

Thirdly, a unregulated power supply design typically has an average current draw less than that of a regulated amplifier which makes it more efficient on average. A unregulated power supply does have more peak instantanious current draw for dynamic musical input, this gives the amplifier the unbridled capability to asking from the battery the power (this peak draw can be 4 times or more the rated fuse size, but only lasts for a few milli-seconds at a time)it needs to try to reproduce a peak muscical note. This in turn gives unregulated amps much more headroom and dynamics than regulated power supply designed amplifiers. This is why all the old Linear Power amps sounded so good and dynamic, they had 3 dB+ of headroom, and plenty of reserve power for dynamics. Other things that go with the unregulated design to make it work well is that the design should be over built. An example of this is that the power supply for the new Linear Power LP2150 is only working at around 15 percent of capability to produce rated power, this gives tremendous reserve power and headroom, and nearly un-believable longivity and reliability.

Edited by Linear Power
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The LP2150 will probably be first since it matches all of our component systems for their power handling and still makes one heck of a subwoofer amp too. There is a possibility we will issue the other amps at the same time

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Any other differences between the LP2150 and the LP2250 other than the power and the fan?

Any chance of seeing a "dual mono" LP2250 in the future? Maybe custom made?

Kelvin

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Any other differences between the LP2150 and the LP2250 other than the power and the fan?

Any chance of seeing a "dual mono" LP2250 in the future? Maybe custom made?

Kelvin

There is no differences in the LP2150 and the LP2250 other than about 3 inches more heat sink and more power, features and SQ are the same. For that fact, ALL of the 2 channel stereo amps will have the EXACT same pre-amp and output circuit topology, they will just have smaller or larger number of output devices and run on a different internal voltage.

The LP2150 is way stronger than the old 3002 (150 x 2) and stronger still than the 2.2HV, and almost as strong as the old 5002. The LP2250 when it comes out will give the 8002SW a run for its money when its bridged and easily beat the 3.2HV in stereo or bridged modes.

No, we have no plans for a dual mono version of the LP2250. We may eventually make one larger amp, if so it will be the LP2400 and would be 400 watts RMS per channel, this amp would easily outperform the 4.1HVS.

All the new Linear Power amps will have the built in fan cicruit, that will operate at temperatures above 60 degrees C, (140 degrees F) The smaller amps will not come with the fan shroud but it will be an option. The multi-channel amps and the larger 2 channels (LP2250 and if we make larger) will come with a fan shroud as standard issue.

Edited by Linear Power
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